Adirondack Health Institute News

The Prevention Agenda: Chronic Disease Objectives

As one of the Prevention Agenda’s priority areas, chronic disease has several objectives.

  • By the year 2013, reduce the prevalence of adult diabetes and hospital complications of diabetes in New York so that:

The percent of adults with diabetes is no more that 5.7%.

The rate of hospitalizations for short-term complications of diabetes are no more than:

2.3 per 10,000 (ages 6-17)

3.9 per 10,000 (ages 18+)

  • By the year 2013, reduce the age-adjusted coronary heart disease hospitalization rate in New Yorkers to no more than 48 per 10,000
  • By the year 2013, reduce the congestive heart failure hospitalizations rate among New York adults (ages 18+) to no more than 33 per 100,000
  • By the year 2013, reduce New York’s age-adjusted cerebrovascular disease (stroke) mortality rate to no more than 24 per 100,000
  • By the year 2013, reduce the age-adjusted cancer mortality rate to no more than:

21.3 per 100,000 females for breast cancer*

2.0 per 100,000 females for cervical cancer*

13.7 per 100,000 for colorectal cancer*

*Healthy People 2010 Objective

Please note additional cancer-related objectives have been included in the priority area section entitled “Access to Quality Care”.

 

For more info visit:  www.health.ny.gov/prevention/prevention_agenda/chronic_disease/index.htm.

 

 

SAVE THE DATE! Adirondack Medical Home Summit – 2013

The Adirondack Medical Home Summit 2013 is scheduled for Wednesday, September 25 in Lake Placid, NY.  This year’s Summit will include keynote speaker, Dr. Paul Grundy from IBM Global Administration.

This invitation only event hosted 150 attendees at last year’s event.  For more info on last year’s Summit, click here.

 

The Prevention Agenda – the Burden of Chronic Disease

Chronic diseases such as asthma, cancer, diabetes, heart disease and stroke are the leading causes of disability and death in the United States.  These disease account for seven of every ten deaths and affect the quality of life of 90 million Americans.  In 2001, over 70% of all deaths that occurred in New York State were due to chronic diseases.  In addition to causing major limitations in daily living and leading to high costs of health care, chronic diseases are among the most preventable.  Factors such as reducing or preventing tobacco use, poor diet and physical inactivity, are known to protect and reduce the incidence of chronic disease.

Chronic disease prevention is rooted in the modification of risk factors, the detection of chronic diseases in their earliest stages, and the treatment of chronic disease and attention to disease management and self-management by diagnosed individuals in order to prevent debilitating and costly complications.  This priority area section includes information about the major chronic diseases and conditions affecting New Yorkers, as well as the associated risk factors.

For more information and to read the objectives of New York State’s Prevention Agenda,  go to http://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/prevention_agenda/chronic_disease/index.htm

Obesity Web Resources

The Adirondack Rural Health Network is pleased to announce the addition a new link on our website, www.arhn.org.

The site now has resources for obesity-related topics, such as:

  • Data, Maps, Trends & Reports
  • Clinical Guidelines & Strategies
  • Community Programs & Services
  • Tools & Resources for Individuals and Families

 

Just click on Obesity Resources at the top of the list on the left side of the website.

New York State Prevention Agenda 2013-2017

The New York State Prevention Agenda serves as the blueprint for state and local community action to improve the health of New Yorkers and address health disparities. We will highlight some of the major parts of the Prevention Agenda.

The Five Priority Areas:

  • Prevent Chronic Disease – Focus on heart disease, cancer, respiratory disease, and diabetes and the shared risk factors of diet, exercise, tobacco, alcohol and associated obesity.
  • Promote a Health and Safe Environment – Focus on environment quality (air, water, etc.) and the physical environment where people live, work, play and learn.
  • Promote Healthy Women, Infants and Children – Focus on improving the health of women and mothers, birth outcomes, and child health, including oral health.
  • Promote Mental Health and Prevent Substance Abuse - Focus on primary and secondary prevention and strategies for increasing screening to diagnose and connect people to needed services.
  • Prevent HIV, STDs and Vaccine Preventable Diseases – Focus on preventing HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and vaccine preventable diseases via immunizations.

 

More in depth information on each of the five priority areas to follow.

http://www.health.ny.gov/prevention/prevention_agenda/2013-2017/

 

New York State Prevention Agenda 2013-2017

The New York State Prevention Agenda serves as the blueprint for state and local community action to improve the health of New Yorkers and address health disparities.  We will highlight some of the major parts of the Prevention Agenda.

The New York State Prevention Agenda was developed and approved by the New York State Public Health Planning Council (PHHPC) via:

*Assessment of progress on the Prevention Agenda 2008-2012

*Examination of current health status of New York’s population – health assessment 2012

*Provide feedback from stakeholders on proposed priorities

A set of public health improvement priorities and goals designed to serve as a guide for stakeholders to improve the health of NYS residents over the next 5 years, including:

*Community

*Business

*Health Care providers & hospitals

*Government & others

Five Overarching Goals:

*Improve the health status in five priority areas and reduce racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and other health disparities, including those among persons with disabilities;

*Advance a “health in all policies” approach to address broad social determinants of health;

*Create and strengthen public-private and multi-stakeholder partnerships to achieve public health improvement at state and local levels

*Increase investment in prevention and public health to improve health, control health care costs and increase economic productivity; and

*Strengthen governmental and non-governmental public health agencies and resources at state and local levels.